Wildlife

Wildlife sculpture from award-winning British Artist Sally Amoore.

The Elephant is often regarded as one of the world’s most intelligent and sociable animals. Widely believed to understand emotion Elephants understand basic communication and have been found to play with one another. In many cultures, elephants represent strength, power, wisdom, longevity, stamina, leadership, sociability, nurturance and loyalty.

Elephants are scattered throughout sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. Unforunately African elephants are listed as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) while the Asian elephant is classed as endangered.

The Impala is a medium-sized antelope found in eastern and southern Africa known for it’s characteristic bounding leaps.

The historical range of the impala – spanning across southern and eastern Africa – has remained intact to a great extent, although it has disappeared from a few places. The range extends from central and southern Kenya and northeastern Uganda in the east to northern KwaZulu-Natal in the south, and westward up to Namibia and southern Angola.

The Highland Stag is a subspecies of Red Deer native to Great Britain. This deer is slightly smaller than other Western European red deer. In summer, the coat is lighter in colour with a distinct border to the lighter patch on the rump. The rest of the colour is dark reddish brown with a greyer face and neck. The legs are blackish brown. In winter the animal grows long hair on the neck. The brow and the bez tines of the antler are usually close together and at a distance above the burr.

This deer thrives in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland and in parts of England such as Westmorland, Devon, Somerset, Wiltshire and the New Forest. It is also found in County Kerry and Donegal in Ireland. However, most of the red deer kept in parks in the British Isles are derived from the larger subspecies brought from the European mainland, the Western European Red Deer.

Although mostly found in the north of Scotland, there are reports of deer being spotted in the Borders.

The Impala is a medium-sized antelope found in eastern and southern Africa known for it’s characteristic bounding leaps.

The historical range of the impala – spanning across southern and eastern Africa – has remained intact to a great extent, although it has disappeared from a few places. The range extends from central and southern Kenya and northeastern Uganda in the east to northern KwaZulu-Natal in the south, and westward up to Namibia and southern Angola.

One of the most widely recognised animal symbols in human culture, the lion has been extensively depicted in various artforms, on national flags, and in contemporary films and literature. It appeared as a symbol for strength and nobility in cultures across Europe, Asia and Africa. The lion has been depicted as “king of the jungle” and “king of beasts”, and thus became a popular symbol for royalty and stateliness.

The lion prefers grassy plains and savannahs, scrub bordering rivers and open woodlands with bushes. It is absent from rainforest and rarely enters closed forest. In Eurasia, the lion once ranged from Greece to India; Herodotus reported that lions had been common in Greece in 480 BC but today it has been reduced to fragmented populations in Sub-Saharan Africa and one critically endangered population in western India.

The common hippopotamus is the third-largest type of land mammal, being only smaller than elephants and some rhinoceroses and inhabits rivers, lakes and mangrove swamps.

Different from all other large land mammals, hippos are of semiaquatic habits, spending the day in lakes and rivers. In a Ndebele tale, the hippo originally had long, beautiful hair, but was set on fire by a jealous hare and had to jump into a nearby pool. The hippo lost most of his hair and was too embarrassed to leave the water. During the day, they remain cool by staying in the water or mud; reproduction and childbirth both occur in water. They emerge at dusk to graze on grasses. While hippopotamuses rest near each other in the water, grazing is a solitary activity and hippos are not territorial on land.

The common hippopotamus is the third-largest type of land mammal, being only smaller than elephants and some rhinoceroses and inhabits rivers, lakes and mangrove swamps.

Different from all other large land mammals, hippos are of semiaquatic habits, spending the day in lakes and rivers. In a Ndebele tale, the hippo originally had long, beautiful hair, but was set on fire by a jealous hare and had to jump into a nearby pool. The hippo lost most of his hair and was too embarrassed to leave the water. During the day, they remain cool by staying in the water or mud; reproduction and childbirth both occur in water. They emerge at dusk to graze on grasses. While hippopotamuses rest near each other in the water, grazing is a solitary activity and hippos are not territorial on land.

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